Diversity is not about numbers (but even that would be a start)

Diversity is not about numbers (but even that would be a start)

Whether you are funding culture, climate or human rights, different people bring different perspectives. To have a workforce with a range of backgrounds brings fresh ideas, insight and networks. However Rose Longhurst, 2017-18 Atlantic Fellow, discovered a surprising resistance to the concept at a recent conference.

Why do we care so little about those who care for children?

Why do we care so little about those who care for children?

The way we approach care work is undeniably gendered, it’s not considered ‘work’ because men have defined what constitutes ‘work’, and traditionally men haven’t done much caring. There is a circular (il)logic at play: we don’t value care because we assume women should be doing it, and because women do it, we don’t value it.

The inequality of social care - how pursuing profits puts us all at risk

The inequality of social care - how pursuing profits puts us all at risk

The government has outsourced residential adult care and most provision is privatised. Many care homes are owned by hedge funds that operate on high risk high return principles, expect a 12% annual profit, avoid tax payments, and either flip the companies once the profit has been stripped or load the company with debt in order to leverage more debt for other activities.

How can we let this happen?

 

Self-Help Groups are helping women find a voice in India's tribal communities

Self-Help Groups are helping women find a voice in India's tribal communities

The Adivasi - or tribal communities - make up around 8.6% of India’s population. They are the poorest group in India and are among the most socially marginalised, considered to be ‘outside’ Indian society and stereotyped as lazy, alcoholic, and dirty. And women are further marginalised by their internal social structures.

But, with the introduction of Self Help Groups, the female Adivasi are finding their voice.