Senegal's election: weighing the democratic deficit

Senegal's election: weighing the democratic deficit

Senegal’s re-elected president says he is willing to open a new chapter. But transforming the country will take more than a new president or fairer elections: the Senegalese people need a new consciousness, argues Elimane Haby Kane

Slums and super-projects: housing Inequality In Lagos

Slums and super-projects: housing Inequality In Lagos

It is time Nigeria’s government stopped looking past the ‘eyesores’ of Lagos’ shantytowns as it focuses on plans for an urban megacity that the majority of the city’s inhabitants will not be able to afford to live in. An inclusive city is essential for citizens and a sustainable economy alike, writes Fola Adeleke.

Intersectionality, Activist Organising and Sisters Uncut

Intersectionality, Activist Organising and Sisters Uncut

To understand how campaigning movements contest power relations and social inequalities, we must focus not only on their public actions, but also how they address inequalities within their own spaces, write Dr Armine Ishkanian and Anita Peña Saavedra

Systems (re)thinking: in ITC4D, tech is never neutral

Systems (re)thinking: in ITC4D, tech is never neutral

When governments, NGOs or corporations tout the benefits of their new ICT interventions, we need to consider whose notion of progress they will serve, and ask the “beneficiaries” how (and if) they want to participate, argues Taylor Downs.

Building a FRAME for a new world order

Building a FRAME for a new world order

“Everywhere I go, I’m asked if I can continue the documentation of what feminist filmmakers are making possible because of their filmmaking,” says Jane Sloane, on the eve of the Berlin opening of FRAME: How Asia Pacific Feminist Filmmakers and Artists Are Confronting Inequalities.

Hard roads: life in austerity Harare is an uphill climb

Hard roads: life in austerity Harare is an uphill climb

Getting around a big city with young children can be difficult nearly anywhere in the world, but in austerity-gripped Zimbabwe’s capital city, those challenges are compounded by a crumbling transport system, writes Maureen Sigauke.

Zimbabwe: no festivities in the festive season

Zimbabwe: no festivities in the festive season

As millions around the world celebrated Christmas, there was scant merriment for most Zimbabweans. A year after the ouster of Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s economic collapse and hyperinflation, writes Maureen Sigauke, is a sobering illustration of the fact that inequality is not just “a bug in the system”.

Inequality, data and ownership: joining the dots

Inequality, data and ownership: joining the dots

Classical debates about power and inequality, from Locke to Marx, centre on the topic of ownership. In our digital age, these theoretical views may seem outdated, writes Gabriella Razzano. But the exponential growth of our “personal” data and corporations’ widespread use of it make these frameworks more valuable than ever.

Zimbabwe's poor pay price for austerity policies

Zimbabwe's poor pay price for austerity policies

Zimbabwe’s government has proclamed the country ‘open for business’ and cut spending in a bid to attract Chinese investment. But hyperinflation and a doctors’ strike point to the cost in misery, writes Craig Dube.

Apps and the gender gap: why ‘mobile money’ leaves poor women behind

Apps and the gender gap: why ‘mobile money’ leaves poor women behind

Digital developments have aided the recent rise in access to banking. But in many parts of the developing world, the gender gap in financial inclusion has failed to shift in the developing world; in Bangladesh, it has risen significantly. Technology alone can’t provide the solutions, writes Anjali Sarker.

Green New Deal? Don't forget your union card

Green New Deal? Don't forget your union card

While the Green New Deal endorsed by Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and other Democrats holds out great promise, writes Lauren Burke, the right to organise must be enshrined in such proposals if we are to take serve the environment and citizens alike.

What does Eleanor Roosevelt have to do with Black Lives Matter?

What does Eleanor Roosevelt have to do with Black Lives Matter?

Seventy years after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights”, writes Allison Corkery, it is time to ensure that economic and social equity are seen as essential components of human rights.

Sunny places, shady deals: financial secrecy is an inequality issue

Sunny places, shady deals: financial secrecy is an inequality issue

Danske Bank's Estonian branch was charged in what may be one of the largest ever money-laundering cases. This is at heart an inequality issue, writes Louise Russell-Prywata: financial secrecy has allowed wealthy people, aided by banks and financial advisers, to steal huge sums from underfunded public sectors.

Philip Alston has come and gone. Now who will be the change-makers?

Philip Alston has come and gone. Now who will be the change-makers?

In the wake of an unsparing report on UK poverty by the UN’s Special Rapporteur, Nicola Browne argues that just as those hardest hit by austerity were at the heart of Alston’s visit, they should be at the forefront of making sure his recommendations become reality. 

Power in a union: United Airlines workers join forces and win

Power in a union: United Airlines workers join forces and win

Even in an age of declining union membership, and despite employers’ concerted anti-union efforts, writes Lauren Burke, it is still possible to win certification when workers’ resolve to improve their jobs and lives is supported by good organising strategy.