Care

Women and care work: we're stuck in a revolving door

Women and care work: we're stuck in a revolving door

When it comes to who does the caring and the housework, it’s time for us to call out sexism for what it is, says Saida Ali . “Woke” policies will never be enough if individuals fail to change their own behaviour.

Hard roads: life in austerity Harare is an uphill climb

Hard roads: life in austerity Harare is an uphill climb

Getting around a big city with young children can be difficult nearly anywhere in the world, but in austerity-gripped Zimbabwe’s capital city, those challenges are compounded by a crumbling transport system, writes Maureen Sigauke.

Zimbabwe: no festivities in the festive season

Zimbabwe: no festivities in the festive season

As millions around the world celebrated Christmas, there was scant merriment for most Zimbabweans. A year after the ouster of Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s economic collapse and hyperinflation, writes Maureen Sigauke, is a sobering illustration of the fact that inequality is not just “a bug in the system”.

Why do we care so little about those who care for children?

Why do we care so little about those who care for children?

The way we approach care work is undeniably gendered. It’s not considered ‘work’ because men have defined what constitutes ‘work’, and traditionally men haven’t done much caring. There is a circular (il)logic at play: we don’t value care because we assume women should be doing it, and because women do it, we don’t value it.