Civil society

Lawyered up: why open justice isn't working

Lawyered up: why open justice isn't working

The court records system is almost impossible for non-insiders to navigate. And too many legal insiders want to keep it that way, because it allows them to game the system via ‘rules lawyering’, says Gabriella Razzano.

‘Where are the SADC and UN when we need them?’

‘Where are the SADC and UN when we need them?’

When a fellow kombi passenger demands to know why the African Union, SADC and UN aren’t helping to tackle Zimbabwe’s woes, Maureen Sigauke is spurred to reflect on regional and global integration and governance. Are these organisations farcical, ineffective — or grounds for hope?

Senegal: a petro-scandal revealed

Senegal: a petro-scandal revealed

Secrets relating to the management of oil contracts in Senegal are coming to light, writes Elimane Kane, and they implicate both BP and the government in a case worth billions of dollars. He invites all those who support transparency and equity to sign a petition launched by LEGS-Africa calling for action.

Sénégal: un scandale pétrolière se dévoile

Sénégal: un scandale pétrolière se dévoile

La gestion des contrats pétroliers au Sénégal commence à montrer ses secrets, ecrit Elimane Kane, impliquant BP et le gouvernement dans un affaire de milliards de dollars. Il invite toutes les personnes qui soutiennent la transparence et l'équité à signer une pétition lancée par LEGS-Africa.

Unnatural disasters: tackling cholera in Zimbabwe

Unnatural disasters: tackling cholera in Zimbabwe

Africa Day commemorates a continent’s freedom from colonial rule, writes Craig Dube, but Africa is not truly free when so many Africans are still dying of disease or disaster through being denied the resources afforded to their neighbours.

Senegal's election: weighing the democratic deficit

Senegal's election: weighing the democratic deficit

Senegal’s re-elected president says he is willing to open a new chapter. But transforming the country will take more than a new president or fairer elections: the Senegalese people need a new consciousness, argues Elimane Kane

Systems (re)thinking: in ITC4D, tech is never neutral

Systems (re)thinking: in ITC4D, tech is never neutral

When governments, NGOs or corporations tout the benefits of their new ICT interventions, we need to consider whose notion of progress they will serve, and ask the “beneficiaries” how (and if) they want to participate, argues Taylor Downs.

Hard roads: life in austerity Harare is an uphill climb

Hard roads: life in austerity Harare is an uphill climb

Getting around a big city with young children can be difficult nearly anywhere in the world, but in austerity-gripped Zimbabwe’s capital city, those challenges are compounded by a crumbling transport system, writes Maureen Sigauke.

Zimbabwe: no festivities in the festive season

Zimbabwe: no festivities in the festive season

As millions around the world celebrated Christmas, there was scant merriment for most Zimbabweans. A year after the ouster of Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s economic collapse and hyperinflation, writes Maureen Sigauke, is a sobering illustration of the fact that inequality is not just “a bug in the system”.

Inequality, data and ownership: joining the dots

Inequality, data and ownership: joining the dots

Classical debates about power and inequality, from Locke to Marx, centre on the topic of ownership. In our digital age, these theoretical views may seem outdated, writes Gabriella Razzano. But the exponential growth of our “personal” data and corporations’ widespread use of it make these frameworks more valuable than ever.

Zimbabwe's poor pay price for austerity policies

Zimbabwe's poor pay price for austerity policies

Zimbabwe’s government has proclamed the country ‘open for business’ and cut spending in a bid to attract Chinese investment. But hyperinflation and a doctors’ strike point to the cost in misery, writes Craig Dube.

What does Eleanor Roosevelt have to do with Black Lives Matter?

What does Eleanor Roosevelt have to do with Black Lives Matter?

Seventy years after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights”, writes Allison Corkery, it is time to ensure that economic and social equity are seen as essential components of human rights.

Sunny places, shady deals: financial secrecy is an inequality issue

Sunny places, shady deals: financial secrecy is an inequality issue

Danske Bank's Estonian branch was charged in what may be one of the largest ever money-laundering cases. This is at heart an inequality issue, writes Louise Russell-Prywata: financial secrecy has allowed wealthy people, aided by banks and financial advisers, to steal huge sums from underfunded public sectors.