Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity

Tehran's 'hope' rings hollow for human rights campaigners

Tehran's 'hope' rings hollow for human rights campaigners

The campaign of disappearances, arrests and prosecutions of environmental and women’s rights activists and labour and teachers’ union campaigners casts doubt on the Iranian government’s calls for sustainable development and a “coalition of hope”, write Masana Ndinga-Kanga and Sohrab Razzaghi.

Funders and the myth of 'financial sustainability'

Funders and the myth of 'financial sustainability'

Funders inevitably ask small change-making organisations if they are financially sustainable, but Rose Longhurst believes this is the wrong question. Should healthy balance sheets really be their primary aim? Don’t we want these groups to change the world, so they no longer need to exist?

Africa's digital economy must have women at its heart

Africa's digital economy must have women at its heart

The growth of digitalisation and technology is a disruptive opportunity for African countries to leapfrog their development and economic transformation, says Crystal Simeoni, as she reflects on the 2019 Pan African Conference on Illicit Financial Flows and Taxation.

Lawyered up: why open justice isn't working

Lawyered up: why open justice isn't working

The court records system is almost impossible for non-insiders to navigate. And too many legal insiders want to keep it that way, because it allows them to game the system via ‘rules lawyering’, says Gabriella Razzano.

Empire and insights, Grenfell and the Global South: my fellowship year

Empire and insights, Grenfell and the Global South: my fellowship year

“The capital of my former colonisers is a beautiful and a fatally unequal place,” says Maureen Sigauke, who observes that London’s inequality formed an instructive counterpart to a challenging and transformative active fellowship year.

White men in politics - who needs us?

White men in politics - who needs us?

In Brazil, 63% of elected representatives in Congress are white men, which is a group that makes up just 22% of the population. Pedro Telles argues that white men like him certainly have a role in politics - but not in the space they currently dominate.

Staples: a story about accessing court records

Staples: a story about accessing court records

Court records are legally required to be open, but all too often courts are full of closed doors and barriers, says Gabriella Razzano of a long, frustrating journey through the labyrinth that is Western Cape High Court in South Africa.

Chileans win historic victory over toxic 'sacrifice zone'

Chileans win historic victory over toxic 'sacrifice zone'

Chile’s Supreme Court has ruled that the government is responsible for the environmental and health costs of extractive industries, writes Anita Peña Saavedra, thanks to the patience, persistence and power of grassroots mobilisation, cooperation and focused pressure.

War: still turning a profit for the world’s elites

War: still turning a profit for the world’s elites

Most of us gain nothing and lose much from living in an increasingly militarised world, observes Milena Abrahamyan, and those at the bottom lose most of all. Economies may boom in times of war, but so does inequality, and the collateral damage from weapons manufacturers’ wares are inevitably the poor.

‘Where are the SADC and UN when we need them?’

‘Where are the SADC and UN when we need them?’

When a fellow kombi passenger demands to know why the African Union, SADC and UN aren’t helping to tackle Zimbabwe’s woes, Maureen Sigauke is spurred to reflect on regional and global integration and governance. Are these organisations farcical, ineffective — or grounds for hope?

Senegal: a petro-scandal revealed

Senegal: a petro-scandal revealed

Secrets relating to the management of oil contracts in Senegal are coming to light, writes Elimane Kane, and they implicate both BP and the government in a case worth billions of dollars. He invites all those who support transparency and equity to sign a petition launched by LEGS-Africa calling for action.

Sénégal: un scandale pétrolière se dévoile

Sénégal: un scandale pétrolière se dévoile

La gestion des contrats pétroliers au Sénégal commence à montrer ses secrets, ecrit Elimane Kane, impliquant BP et le gouvernement dans un affaire de milliards de dollars. Il invite toutes les personnes qui soutiennent la transparence et l'équité à signer une pétition lancée par LEGS-Africa.

The check-yourself list: why women aren’t talking

The check-yourself list: why women aren’t talking

What makes articulate, informed women keep silent, even in social justice spaces? Why are men so at ease with taking up so much speaking time, even in organisations working for change? Nicola Browne and Renata Cuk on the ‘aha’ moment when they realised it wasn’t just them…

Kenya's widows: leading the fight for dignity

Kenya's widows: leading the fight for dignity

Widows in Kenya suffer social exclusion, economic inequality and physical and sexual violence, writes Roseline Orwa. Education and grassroots initiatives are essential to the fight for their human rights.

Women challenging war: a feminist lens on patriarchy and conflict

Women challenging war: a feminist lens on patriarchy and conflict

In the South Caucasus, where three conflicts have been ongoing since the 1990s, many women’s organizations are working to build peace. But relatively few, writes Milena Abrahamyan, draw on feminist analysis to focus on the links between patriarchy and violence at all levels, from the home to the battlefield.

Slums and super-projects: housing Inequality In Lagos

Slums and super-projects: housing Inequality In Lagos

It is time Nigeria’s government stopped looking past the ‘eyesores’ of Lagos’ shantytowns as it focuses on plans for an urban megacity that the majority of the city’s inhabitants will not be able to afford to live in. An inclusive city is essential for citizens and a sustainable economy alike, writes Fola Adeleke.

Intersectionality, Activist Organising and Sisters Uncut

Intersectionality, Activist Organising and Sisters Uncut

To understand how campaigning movements contest power relations and social inequalities, we must focus not only on their public actions, but also how they address inequalities within their own spaces, write Dr Armine Ishkanian and Anita Peña Saavedra

Systems (re)thinking: in ITC4D, tech is never neutral

Systems (re)thinking: in ITC4D, tech is never neutral

When governments, NGOs or corporations tout the benefits of their new ICT interventions, we need to consider whose notion of progress they will serve, and ask the “beneficiaries” how (and if) they want to participate, argues Taylor Downs.

Join us in the Fight for a More Equal World

Join us in the Fight for a More Equal World

Welcome to the new blog from the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity.

These pages will feature the latest writing from our Atlantic Fellows on issues connected to inequalities around the world. This will be a rich source of debate on the causes, effects, and possible solutions for inequalities around the world, and a stepping stone to strengthening the fight against inequity.

But what is AFSEE?