feminism

Building a FRAME for a new world order

Building a FRAME for a new world order

“Everywhere I go, I’m asked if I can continue the documentation of what feminist filmmakers are making possible because of their filmmaking,” says Jane Sloane, on the eve of the Berlin opening of FRAME: How Asia Pacific Feminist Filmmakers and Artists Are Confronting Inequalities.

Speaking out against sexual harassment: #16daysofactivism and #HearMeToo

Speaking out against sexual harassment: #16daysofactivism and #HearMeToo

During this year’s 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, the global advocacy theme is Orange the World: #HearMeToo. Key to this initiative, writes Kripa Basnyat, is the fight against sexual harassment at work, and the policy changes that will help ensure workplaces are safe and respectful places for all.

'Making women's lives visible is a political act'

'Making women's lives visible is a political act'

“Bringing a female lens and feminist perspective to the way films are created and how the world is viewed is often a political act,” says Jane Sloane, speaking at the opening of her exhibition FRAME: How Asia Pacific Feminist Filmmakers and Artists Are Confronting Inequalities, created in collaboration with Ariel and Sam Soto-Suver.

IWD - Let Down by the System and Still She Rises

IWD - Let Down by the System and Still She Rises

Jane Anyango is a spirited activist whose courage transcends the ethnic and political divide in the Kibera slum in Nairobi. In 2004 Jane founded PolyCom Development Project, a community initiative in response to the high rates of sexual exploitation of adolescent girls in Kibera. But it was the killing of one of her mentees - a 15-year-old girl - shot by the police during the 2007-2008 post-election demonstrations in Kibera - that triggered Jane to mobilise Kibera women.

Constucting Justice in Cape Town, One Toilet at a Time

 Constucting Justice in Cape Town, One Toilet at a Time

Cape Town is one of the most unequal spaces in the world’s most unequal country.  If you are female, black and poor, you’re more likely to live in a place where there’s high crime, low or no lighting and little access to safe toilets, sanitation or to justice.