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What does Eleanor Roosevelt have to do with Black Lives Matter?

What does Eleanor Roosevelt have to do with Black Lives Matter?

Seventy years after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights proclaimed “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights”, writes Allison Corkery, it is time to ensure that economic and social equity are seen as essential components of human rights.

Sunny places, shady deals: financial secrecy is an inequality issue

Sunny places, shady deals: financial secrecy is an inequality issue

Danske Bank's Estonian branch was charged in what may be one of the largest ever money-laundering cases. This is at heart an inequality issue, writes Louise Russell-Prywata: financial secrecy has allowed wealthy people, aided by banks and financial advisers, to steal huge sums from underfunded public sectors.

Philip Alston has come and gone. Now who will be the change-makers?

Philip Alston has come and gone. Now who will be the change-makers?

In the wake of an unsparing report on UK poverty by the UN’s Special Rapporteur, Nicola Browne argues that just as those hardest hit by austerity were at the heart of Alston’s visit, they should be at the forefront of making sure his recommendations become reality. 

Power in a union: United Airlines workers join forces and win

Power in a union: United Airlines workers join forces and win

Even in an age of declining union membership, and despite employers’ concerted anti-union efforts, writes Lauren Burke, it is still possible to win certification when workers’ resolve to improve their jobs and lives is supported by good organising strategy.

Speaking out against sexual harassment: #16daysofactivism and #HearMeToo

Speaking out against sexual harassment: #16daysofactivism and #HearMeToo

During this year’s 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, the global advocacy theme is Orange the World: #HearMeToo. Key to this initiative, writes Kripa Basnyat, is the fight against sexual harassment at work, and the policy changes that will help ensure workplaces are safe and respectful places for all.

'Making women's lives visible is a political act'

'Making women's lives visible is a political act'

“Bringing a female lens and feminist perspective to the way films are created and how the world is viewed is often a political act,” says Jane Sloane, speaking at the opening of her exhibition FRAME: How Asia Pacific Feminist Filmmakers and Artists Are Confronting Inequalities, created in collaboration with Ariel and Sam Soto-Suver.

Diversity is not about numbers (but even that would be a start)

Diversity is not about numbers (but even that would be a start)

Whether you are funding culture, climate or human rights, different people bring different perspectives. To have a workforce with a range of backgrounds brings fresh ideas, insight and networks. However Rose Longhurst, 2017-18 Atlantic Fellow, discovered a surprising resistance to the concept at a recent conference.

Why do we care so little about those who care for children?

Why do we care so little about those who care for children?

The way we approach care work is undeniably gendered. It’s not considered ‘work’ because men have defined what constitutes ‘work’, and traditionally men haven’t done much caring. There is a circular (il)logic at play: we don’t value care because we assume women should be doing it, and because women do it, we don’t value it.

The inequality of social care: how pursuing profits puts us all at risk

The inequality of social care: how pursuing profits puts us all at risk

The government has outsourced residential adult care and most provision is privatised. Many care homes are owned by hedge funds that operate on high risk high return principles, expect a 12% annual profit, avoid tax payments, and either flip the companies once the profit has been stripped or load the company with debt in order to leverage more debt for other activities. How can we let this happen?

Self-Help Groups are helping women find a voice in India's tribal communities

Self-Help Groups are helping women find a voice in India's tribal communities

The Adivasi - or tribal communities - make up around 8.6% of India’s population. They are the poorest group in India and are among the most socially marginalised, considered to be ‘outside’ Indian society and stereotyped as lazy, alcoholic, and dirty. And women are further marginalised by their internal social structures.

But, with the introduction of Self Help Groups, the female Adivasi are finding their voice.

IWD - Funding our inseparable struggles

IWD - Funding our inseparable struggles

If you visit this year’s International Women’s Day website, which I encourage everyone to do, you will be prompted to make a pledge to #PressforProgress. The 2018 theme recognizes the gains women have made, while also acknowledging the progress still needed to reach true gender parity. As I think about the one way (and there are many) I would like to see philanthropy live this year’s theme, it is simple: apply an intersectional lens to our women and girls work.

IWD - Let Down by the System and Still She Rises

IWD - Let Down by the System and Still She Rises

Jane Anyango is a spirited activist whose courage transcends the ethnic and political divide in the Kibera slum in Nairobi. In 2004 Jane founded PolyCom Development Project, a community initiative in response to the high rates of sexual exploitation of adolescent girls in Kibera. But it was the killing of one of her mentees - a 15-year-old girl - shot by the police during the 2007-2008 post-election demonstrations in Kibera - that triggered Jane to mobilise Kibera women.

IWD - Becoming a Symbol: the Palestinian girl on trial for making a stand

IWD - Becoming a Symbol: the Palestinian girl on trial for making a stand

Out of the harsh reality and the day to day struggles of life in an occupied Palestinian village, Ahd Tamimi - a 17-year old girl - emerges as an activist fighting for emancipation from the oppression, discrimination and dispossession exercised by the Israeli Occupation.

Don’t hate the player, hate the game

Don’t hate the player, hate the game

I always feel torn whenever I write something that criticises philanthropists. On the one hand, if a wealthy person spends their money on an arts institute, then isn’t that better than them buying another superyacht? I’d hate to think that I contributed to a narrative that discouraged nice rich folk to engage in altruism. On the other hand, I'm sickened by the concept that super-wealthy people are given tax breaks to wield power over others.

Inequality runs deeper than income

Inequality runs deeper than income

A team of LSE researchers, led by Abigail McKnight, and Oxfam experts, led by Alex Prats at Oxfam Intermón in Barcelona, have been working to develop a multi-dimensional inequality framework and toolkit.  In this short series of blogs they outline the project’s context and objectives, the Inequality Framework and Toolkit themselves, and the progress of two pilots in Spain and Guatemala.  In this first blog Abigail McKnight and Alex Prats discuss the why campaigners should use their Framework to look beyond income inequality.

Wake up, algorithms are trawling your phone while you sleep

Wake up, algorithms are trawling your phone while you sleep

Your web browsing history is the most lucrative piece of information that can be traded, writes Beverley Skeggs. Professor Skeggs gave a public lecture on the topic at LSE in September 2017 You Are Being Tracked, Evaluated and Sold: an analysis of digital inequalities,

How corruption drives inequality, and what we can do about it

How corruption drives inequality, and what we can do about it

The Paradise Papers, and the Panama Papers before, have laid bare the financial secrecy that permits large scale proceeds of corruption, tax avoidance and criminal activity to be laundered, shifted around the globe, and stored out of view from authorities.  Everyday petty corruption also drives inequality around the world. But what can be done?

Louise Russell Prywata explores the key issues and possible solutions.