2018 in review: information sources of the year

What information sources did our contributors find most valuable in 2018? We asked our Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity and the academics and staff of the International Inequalities Institute to tell us where they turned most often.


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University libraries!
Aaron Reeves

A podcast called The Dig, hosted by US journalist Daniel Denvir.
Taylor Downs

Honestly, my favourite information sources in 2018 were the LSE Library and my Twitter feed.
Louise Russell-Prywata

The World Inequality Lab’s Wealth and Income database, which sets new standards in making economic inequality data both easily available and understandable.
Mike Savage

YouTube: there are a lot of debates, talks and lectures on almost every one of the topics that we focus on in the MSc in Inequalities and Social Science programme. I particularly enjoy searching for critics of popular inequalities theories, such as Gregory Mankiw and Ben Shapiro.
Craig Dube


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RealMedia: I have been interviewed by many journalists, and I often despair at their lack of research (while knowing how many difficult deadlines they have to meet). RealMedia actually do the research and ask really good questions. 
Beverley Skeggs

For me, the most valuable information source in 2018 has been The Guardian’s Global Development section.
Fredrick Ouko Alucheli 

The Guardian.
Anjali Sarker

openDemocracy, particularly for Adam Ramsay’s work and the insightful investigative journalism by Peter Geogeghan and Jenna Corderoy that followed the dark money involved in the Brexit vote.
I also loved Mothers of Invention, a podcast with comedian Maeve Higgins and Mary Robinson, the former president of the Republic of Ireland, on women at the grassroots who are working on solutions to climate change.
Nicola Jane Browne

I source a lot of my information about exciting projects and initiatives through FundAction and the Edge Fund. Both are organisations that support grassroots groups, campaigns and actions that fight injustice and inequality, and the stuff I learn about via them is always thrilling.
Rose Longhurst


Young workers in a garment factory in Bangladesh, from the Oxfam report “Reward Work, Not Wealth”

Young workers in a garment factory in Bangladesh, from the Oxfam report “Reward Work, Not Wealth”

The Oxfam report “Reward Work, Not Wealth”, published in January 2018, which showed that the world’s “richest 1 per cent bagged 82 percent of the wealth created last year - and the poorest half of humanity got nothing”.
Pedro Telles

The World Bank’s Socio-Economic Database for Latin America and the Caribbean.
Patricio Espinoza Lucero

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation is an invaluable source of information, research and campaign work on poverty and inequality in the UK.  Every year I await the publication of their annual report on poverty in the UK - it’s the definitive take on the subject.   
Mark Fransham


Our AFSEE and III contributors to this section of the Year in Review:

Nicola Jane Browne, 2018-19 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @nicolajbrowne

Taylor Downs, 2018-19 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @taylordowns2000

Craig Dube, 2018-19 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @kwaDube365

Patricio Espinoza Lucero, 2017-18 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @changespatricio

Dr Mark Fransham, research officer, International Inequalities Institute, London School of Economics and Social Policy @markfransham

Rose Longhurst, 2017-18 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity, @roselonghurst

Fredrick Ouko Alucheli, 2017-18 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @FredrickOuko1

Dr Aaron Reeves, associate professorial research fellow in poverty and inequalit, International Inequalities Institute, London School of Economics and Social Policy, and associate professor in the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford @aaronsreeves

Louise Russell-Prywata, 2017-19 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @_LouiseRP

Anjali Sarker, 2018-19 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @anjalisarker

Professor Mike Savage, director of the International Inequalities Institute, London School of Economics and Social Policy @MikeSav47032563

Professor Beverley Skeggs, academic director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme, International Inequalities Institute, London School of Economics and Social Policy @bevskeggs

Pedro Telles, 2018-19 Atlantic Fellow for Social and Economic Equity @pedrotelles